Selected Works

TV and Audiovisual Appearances
Dr. Fogelman is featured on an episode of The Leon Charney Report that discusses psychology as it relates to Holocaust survivors and their families.
Essays
The rescuers of Jews during the Holocaust were motivated for varying reasons. Once a person became a rescuer, a different self was formed. This essay explores their lives before, during and after the war.
Eva Fogelman gives a psychological perspective of the lives of hidden children both during and after the Holocaust.
An exploration of the mourning process as a creative process for female descendants of Holocaust survivors.
Films
An award-winning documentary about the lives of young adults whose parents survived the Holocaust as they grapple with finding out what happened to their parents and how it has shaped their lives.

Rape during the Nazi Holocaust: Vulnerabilities and Motivations; Fogelman, (2012). Rape during the Nazi Holocaust: Vulnerabilities and Motivations. In Rittner, C. and Roth J.K. Rape: Weapon of War and Genocide. St. Paul: Paragon House.

August 8, 2018

Tags: Sexual Abuse, Sexual Violence, Women, Psychological Dynamics

Dr. Fogelman published her chapter "Vulnerabilities and Motivations" in Ritmer and Roth's anthology on genocide, "Rape: Weapon of war and Genocide," which can be purchased from Publisher's Weekly. Attached is Ritmer and Roth's abstract.

Genocide studies experts Ritmer and Roth (co-editors of Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust) have assembled a tool kit for activists and an informative alarm for general readers with this collection of original essays by distinguished genocide scholars. An effective and affecting immediacy is achieved as each writer uses a particular document (interview, personal letter, trial transcript, formal report) as a point of departure, and many chapters include thought-provoking discussion questions and pertinent suggested readings. From various professional perspectives, the writers reveal that "rape-as-policy-intentional and systematic uses of rape as a weapon of war and genocide--has loomed larger and larger." Essays convey the horrors experienced by Jewish victims of Nazi genocide, victims of ethnic cleansing in the Bosnian War, Guatemalan victims of femicide, and Tutsi victims of all three. Others analyze rape as a tool of "othering" ("the obliteration of a common ground between perpetrators and victims"), assess films treating war and genocide, and consider the development of laws that have the power to protect and to punish. "Rape," as one writer observes, in this grim book, "is a sadly effective weapon of War." That this is a painful book to read should not prevent it from being read. (Sept.)